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English idioms

An idiom is a widely used saying or expression that contains a figurative meaning that is different from the phrase's literal meaning.

vendredi 7 janv. Il y a 14 mois
English idioms
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An idiom is a widely used saying or expression that contains a figurative meaning that is different from the phrase's literal meaning.

Here are some examples:

1. ‘The best of both worlds’ – means you can enjoy two different opportunities at the same time.“By working part-time and looking after her kids two days a week she managed to get the best of both worlds.”

2. ‘Speak of the devil’ – this means that the person you’re just talking about actually appears at that moment. “Hi Tom, speak of the devil, I was just telling Sara about your new car.”

3. ‘See eye to eye’ – this means agreeing with someone. “They finally saw eye to eye on the business deal.”

4. ‘Once in a blue moon’ – an event that happens infrequently. “I only go to the cinema once in a blue moon.”

5. ‘When pigs fly’ – something that will never happen. “When pigs fly she’ll tidy up her room.”

6. ‘To cost an arm and a leg’– something is very expensive. “Fuel these days costs and arm and a leg.”

7. ‘A piece of cake’– something is very easy. “The English test was a piece of cake.”

8. ‘Let the cat out of the bag’ – to accidentally reveal a secret. “I let the cat out of the bag about their wedding plans.”

9. ‘To feel under the weather’ – to not feel well. “I’m really feeling under the weather today; I have a terrible cold.”

10. ‘To kill two birds with one stone’ – to solve two problems at once. “By taking my dad on holiday, I killed two birds with one stone. I got to go away but also spend time with him.”

11. ‘To cut corners’ – to do something badly or cheaply. “They really cut corners when they built this bathroom; the shower is leaking.”

12. ‘To add insult to injury’ – to make a situation worse. “To add insult to injury the car drove off without stopping after knocking me off my bike.”

13. ‘You can’t judge a book by its cover’ – to not judge someone or something based solely on appearance. “I thought this no-brand bread would be horrible; turns out you can’t judge a book by its cover.”

14. ‘Break a leg’ – means ‘good luck’ (often said to actors before they go on stage). “Break a leg Sam, I’m sure your performance will be great.”

15. ‘To hit the nail on the head’ – to describe exactly what is causing a situation or problem. “He hit the nail on the head when he said this company needs more HR support.”

16. ‘A blessing in disguise’ – An misfortune that eventually results in something good happening later on.

17. ‘Call it a day’ – Stop working on something18. ‘Let someone off the hook’ – To allow someone, who have been caught, to not be punished.

19. ‘No pain no gain’ – You have to work hard for something you want.20. ‘Bite the bullet’ – Decide to do something unpleasant that you have avoiding doing.

21. ‘Getting a taste of your own medicine’ – Being treated the same unpleasant way you have treated others.

22. ‘Giving someone the cold shoulder’ – To ignore someone.

23. ‘The last straw’ – The final source of irritation for someone to finally lose patience.

24. ‘The elephant in the room’ – A matter or problem that is obvious of great importance but that is not discussed openly.

25. ‘Stealing someones thunder’ – Taking credit for someone else achievements.

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